All Dressed Up and Nowhere to Go

Malcolm Bradbury

At the end of the 1950s, a debonair and well-dressed Malcolm Bradbury returned from a year in the United States, slightly shattered but not quite broken, to a Britain that had thoroughly changed. Commercial television had started, the beehive hairdo was in, and there were supermarkets instead of grocer's shops.

In this piece of vintage Bradbury, the author of The History Man takes on consumer society and the British character as only he can.

'He restores belief in the power of laughter' Harpers & Queen

'A master not only of language and comedy but of feeling too' Sunday Times

 

Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 978144720559301
Published: 05/07/2011

Malcolm Bradbury

Malcolm Bradbury

 

<p style="\&quot;margin-top:" 0\"="">Malcolm Bradbury was a well-known novelist, critic and academic. He co-founded the famous creative writing department at the University of East Anglia, whose students have included Ian McEwan and Kazuo Ishiguro. His novels are Eating People is Wrong (1959); Stepping Westward (1965); The History Man (1975), which won the Royal Society of Literature Heinemann Prize; Rates of Exchange (1983), which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize; Cuts (1987); Doctor Criminale (1992); and To the Hermitage (2000). He wrote several works of non-fiction, humour and satire, including Who Do You Think You Are? (1976), All Dressed Up and Nowhere to Go (1982) and Why Come to Slaka? (1991). He was an active journalist and a leading television writer, responsible for the adaptations of Porterhouse Blue, Cold Comfort Farm and many TV plays and episodes of Inspector Morse, A Touch of Frost, Kavanagh QC and Dalziel and Pascoe. He was awarded a knighthood in 2000 for services to literature and died later the same year.

 

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