Emily St. John Mandel

Emily St. John Mandel

Emily St. John Mandel was born in Canada and studied dance at The School of Toronto Dance Theatre. She is the author of the novels Last Night in Montreal, The Singer's Gun, The Lola Quartet and Station Eleven and is a staff writer for The Millions. She is married and lives in New York.

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Ten books about cults

Ten books about cults

The idea of a cult can be as gripping as being caught in the throes of one. So if you're vulnerable to persuasive plots and mind-altering outcomes, then read on for a selection of books about cults that have drawn us in and changed the way we think.

The Singer's Gun: a cleverly layered, multi-stranded story

The Singer's Gun: a cleverly layered, multi-stranded story

In Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven, a bleak post-apocalyptic world is transformed into something beautiful by following a travelling Shakespearean theatre company as they pass through ruined town to town. She explores art, celebrity, fame and leaves the reader with a nostalgia for the world we live in. Recently longlisted for the Women's Prize for Fiction, Station Eleven fans include Jessie Burton, Lauren Beukes and George RR Martin. If you've already read (and loved) Station Eleven, why not check out Emily’s first three novels which are released in the UK for this very first time this month.

New book cover designs for Emily St. John Mandel

Not only do we have a brand new cover for the paperback of Station Eleven, out in January 2015, we also have beautiful matching covers for her three other novels, which will be published for the first time in the UK next year.

Apocaliterary fiction and the Museum of Civilisation

The world we live in is a strange one. One full of evil, illness, yet undeniable beauty. It is a world where our elders complain of the younger generation's blunted youth, dumbed down by iPhones, computers and social media; corrupted by gratuitous violence. But in Emily St. John Mandel's novel Station Eleven, amongst many other things, she poses the question: what if we were to lose it all? 

The making of Station Eleven

The making of Station Eleven

Station Eleven, Emily St. John Mandel's beautiful, dark novel set in the days and years after the collapse of civilisation, has a cover to die for. The humble computer screen doesn't do justice to the fluorescent pink of Pantone 806 C which makes up the lettering of the title, so you'll have to look out for copies in the shops from 10 September. In the meantime, we listened in on a conversation about the cover between Emily and Nathan Burton, who designed it.

Shakespeare, plagues, and a post-apocalyptic novel

Shakespeare, plagues, and a post-apocalyptic novel

On the eve of Shakespeare's 450th birthday, people around the world are preparing to celebrate the Bard and his plays. But what is it about his work that means we still celebrate not only his plays, but also his birthday? Emily St. John Mandel’s novel, Station Eleven, features a travelling theatre company that only performs plays by Shakespeare, and perhaps the reason she chose those plays goes some way to answering that question.

Literary sci-fi?

The nominations for sci-fi literary prizes are looking more like the Man Booker each year. What's going on?