Ellen Feldman

Ellen Feldman

Ellen Feldman, a 2009 Guggenheim Fellow, is the author of The Boy Who Loved Anne Frank, Scottsboro, which was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction, and Next To Love. She lives in New York City with her husband.

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An interview with Ellen Feldman

An interview with Ellen Feldman

Guggenheim Fellow Ellen Feldman has written five novels. Her 2009 book Scottsboro, which has been made into a Picador Classic, is inspired by the shocking true story of the Scottsboro boys. In 1931, nine black youths were accused of raping two white girls. An impassioned young journalist tries to save the boys from the electric chair. It's this intersection between individual lives and wider political events and ideals that makes Feldman's writing so powerful.

The exhilaration of writing

Ellen Feldman's latest novel The Unwitting tells the story of a marriage set against the backdrop of the Cold War and the CIA. Here, she talks about her interest in the relationship between the private and the political and how she came to write fiction for a living.

Shelfie!

Shelfie!

While the world has become obsessed with taking selfies, we've been taking shelfies.

When characters talk back

When characters talk back

Finding a voice for your characters is difficult. Ellen Feldman, author of The Unwitting and Scottsboro, shares the advice she was once given by her editor that changed the way she wrote.

Seven tributes to remarkable women

Seven tributes to remarkable women

To celebrate International Women's Day on 8 March, I asked a few of Picador's female authors to write a short paragraph about the woman that most inspired them and why. As the responses came in I laughed, got goosebumps, and felt a tear or two brewing. This collection of voices tells of remarkable women. Some stories are funny, some moving; all will – I hope – leave you feeling inspired.

Next To Love: Read an Extract

Here is the opening extract from the beautiful new novel by Ellen Feldman, Next To Love recently published by Picador. We would love to know what you think!.

Next To Love: Women and the War

Next To Love: Women and the War

The party line during and after World War II was that the Rosie the Riveters, government girls, and other women who took over men’s jobs could not wait to hand them back to returning veterans and go home to their cooking, cleaning, and sewing.  But at the war’s end, many of the women were far from eager to relinquish their work...