Aatish Taseer

Aatish Taseer

Aatish Taseer was born in 1980. He is the author of Stranger to History: a Son's Journey through Islamic Lands (2009), The Temple-Goers (2010), which was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award, and Noon (2011). He has also written for the Sunday TimesProspect and Esquire. He lives between Delhi and New York.

Visit Aatish Taseer's website


#diversedecember

#diversedecember

You may have read or heard about a fantastic initiative on Twitter to get readers recommending and discovering more books by BAME authors: #diversedecember.

Inspired by this, the Picador editorial team have picked out a few books they’ve recently read and would recommend for #diversedecember.

India past and present: Aatish Taseer on his novel The Way Things Were

India past and present: Aatish Taseer on his novel The Way Things Were

The Way Things Were is about many things, but it is first and foremost the story of a family. Can you give us a brief introduction to those characters?

The novel opens with Skanda bringing back the body of his father, Toby, to be cremated in a temple town in India. Toby hasn’t set foot in India, the country he loved, in over two decades. He loved, especially, its classical past; he was a professor of Sanskrit – but that love was a dangerous thing. It blinded him to the reality of the modern country. The Way Things Were is, in one respect, the story of his disenchantment.

A first glimpse at The Way Things Were by Aatish Taseer

Next February, we're publishing Aatish Taseer's latest novel, The Way Things Were. Set in modern day Delhi with flashbacks to private and political events from the past forty years, it's a wonderful story that sweeps from analysis of language to family frailties. 

Here's Aatish talking about the book for the first time.